Sport Science: Bryson DeChambeau

Updated: Apr 8


King Penguin ESPN Sport Science Bryson DeChambeau Club Head Speed

The temperature’s rising, flowers are blooming, and March Madness is over, which means only one thing: The Masters is here. As all eyes in the sports world turn to Augusta, Sport Science hit the links, too. We worked with ESPN to take a closer look at one of the biggest spectacles on the PGA Tour, Bryson DeChambeau.


King Penguin ESPN Sport Science Bryson DeChambeau Single Plane Swing

Outside of his bombastic personality, DeChambeau is known for absolutely crushing the ball off the tee, stretching the limits of what people thought was possible. While his physical appearance has changed a lot in the past few years, the mechanics of his swing also make his long drives possible, and that’s what we chose to focus on. By creating a 3D model of Bryson, we were able to closely demonstrate the intricate movements that help him generate so much power. We also used our 2D graphics to highlight the angles and various details that can be difficult to follow from just the broadcast.


King Penguin ESPN Sport Science Bryson DeChambeau Single Plane Swing

Obviously, big drives just pop off the screen. But, as with most things in sports, there’s more to Bryson DeChambeau’s loud swing than meets the eye. Now, while you’re watching The Masters this weekend, you know the science behind one of golf’s most impressive athletes.


King Penguin ESPN Sport Science Bryson DeChambeau Club Head Speed

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